Where do I place the electrodes for TENS?

Before applying electrode pads, be sure to wash the skin with warm soapy water to remove any dirt, oil or creams that may be present on the skin. T...

How does continence stimulation work?

Continence Stimulation is a therapeutic, safe and highly effective treatment for incontinence that is recommended by doctors, continence adv...

How can pelvic floor exercisers help me?

One in three women (50% of women over the age of 40), and one in seven men will suffer from some form of incontinence during their lives;...

Why do I keep getting the 'LEADS' message on my pelvic floor exerciser?

Resolving ‘LEADS’ message on your pelvic floor exerciser There are two main reasons why you may be getting the ‘LEADS’ message on your control unit...

What is Interstitial Cystitis / Painful Bladder Syndrome?

What is IC / PBS?  Interstitial cystitis (IC) is a condition that results in recurring discomfort or pain in the bladder and the surrounding...

Sacral Nerve Stimulation (SNS) to Treat Incontinence

Sacral Nerve Stimulation (SNS) can be used to treat urinary or faecal incontinence. It uses external electrodes and can be used as an alternative t...

Can I use a pelvic floor exerciser if I have a vaginal prolapse?

If you have a prolapse, you should consult your medical advisor before using a pelvic floor exerciser. Increased muscle tone may help contain the p...

How does continence stimulation help urge incontinence?

Urge incontinence is occurs when the bladder sends a message to the brain telling it that it’s full, and the muscle starts to contract too early (a...

How do I know which type of incontinence I have?

You can fill in the short survey below to see what type of incontinence you have: Stress, Urge or Mixed. What type of Incontinence do I have? You s...

Why should I exercise my pelvic floor muscles?

Pelvic floor exercises can strengthen and tone the muscle whilst also increasing the blood flow to this region. Strong or toned pelvic floor muscle...

What is my pelvic floor?

Your pelvic floor (pubococcygeal or PC) muscles are responsible for holding the bladder, womb and bowel in place and for controlling the muscles th...

What if I can’t do my pelvic floor exercises or kegels?

Research has shown that 30% of women who experience incontinence are unable to voluntarily contract the pelvic floor muscle and require additional ...

How do I find my pelvic floor muscles?

Try to tighten the muscles around your vagina and back passage and lift up, as if you are stopping yourself passing water and wind at the same time...

Can pelvic floor exercisers help with pelvic pain?

Using the “Urge” programme encourages your body to produce endorphins - your own natural painkiller - and can help to relieve pelvic pain. The Urge...

Why do the instructions say that I cannot use pelvic floor exercisers if I have been diagnosed or treated for cervical cancer?

No research has been published showing the effect of electric current on malignant or pre-cancerous cells, so we cannot quantify the risk. C...

What strength should I use and how do I adjust the strength as my pelvic floor muscles improve?

The stronger the contraction, the more exercise you do and the faster the muscle will increase in strength. The sensory nerves are more sens...